September 2018 Dividend Update

Same as the August 2018 Dividend Update, the September 2018 Dividend Update is rather boring (boring = good!). More DRIP’s happened, but the value of the portfolio declined somewhat. All in all, could be worse!

September 2018 Dividend Update

We had no buys or sells in the portfolio this month. Think we already did enough in july! Our cash position grew a tiny bit compared to last month due to dividends coming in. Still waiting for the “big bang” to deploy said cash.

However, we did have another 14(!) companies that allowed DRIP’s (Dividend ReInvestment Plans, i.e. automatic reinvestment of the dividends into new shares, sometimes with discount to the market price), which increases our forward dividend.

Keen on some Canadian shares in your portfolio? Try this awesome list to see which companies might be of interest. Oh, don’t forget to check out the community updates at the Dividend Diplomats and Easy Dividend!

September Dividends

All the dividend deposits received into the bank accounts (and correct for exchange rates) sum up to a total dividend income of €600,06 for September.

Compared to last year we had an decrease of 28.7%. This is the result of the sale of shares such as RDS.A and UN.A, which we used for more real estate investments.

If you purely look at the dividend change in CAD (Canadian Dollars), which is our steady portfolio in our RRSPs, we are up 10.9% compared to last year. Now that is a good development!

The stats for last month:

September 2018 Dividend Update - Dividend Income
September 2018 Dividend Update – Dividend Income

The graph below is showing the yearly dividend totals for 2015, 2016, 2017 and the YTD for 2018. Despite selling many shares in 2017 (reinvested in Real Estate), we might actually beat 2016’s total this year! That’s still very good 🙂

September 2018 Dividend Update - Yearly Dividend
September 2018 Dividend Update – Yearly Dividend

Dividend Stock Overview

Our dividend portfolio now contains 36 companies with a total of 7.907 shares.

The portfolio looks like this:

September Dividend Update - Dividend Overview
September Dividend Update – Dividend Overview

Dividend Sector Breakdown

When you breakdown the previously shown dividend stock overview by sector, it looks as follows:

September 2018 Dividend Update - Sector Allocation
September 2018 Dividend Update – Sector Allocation

 

How was your September on the dividend side of things?

Please follow and like us:

16 Comments

  1. Hey CF,
    Nice month, especially keeping in mind that part of your portfolio was sold out for other investments. Fingers crossed to still beat the result of 2016. And I guess you should easily break through the record of 2017 during next year 🙂
    BI

    1. Hey BI, beating that 2017 number is going to be very hard, as we have not bought many new dividend shares lately and are focussing on real estate and it’s cashflow. Waiting for the stockmarket to correct before we would start buying again. And since my crystal ball is broken, I have no clue when that is 😉

  2. Hi CF, I moved from USA to NL recently and would like to start investing my Euro into Dutch stocks. Can you please recommend good websites which cover news on Dutch public listed companies and offer stock screening for the same?

    Thanks!

    1. My recommendation, don’t focus too much on Dutch stocks. Not the best dividend growth pool of stocks you can find. But you can find some interesting stuff on beleggen.nl en Beursgorilla.nl, for more details you need to check out fd.nl (financieel dagblad), but they all don’t really write stock screenings. However, https://www.polliesdividend.com/, http://www.dutchindependence.com/ and http://www.theroadtoonemillion.com/ write about some Dutch stocks on occasion.
      Good luck!

  3. Your blog has been fun and informative! Thanks!
    Would love to see an update on 2019 wealth tax implications in the Dutch Tax Series 🙂

  4. Not every month can be a top month CF. But you have a nice portfolio.
    There are many unknown names for me. But I don’t invest in Canadian shares. The main reason is the hassle of reclaiming dividend tax.

    My dividend income in September was less than yours but certainly not bad. It’s growing fast because I regularly make new purchases.

    1. That is our benefit, we don’t have any since the shares are in a pension account. Just withdrawal taxes when we take money out of it.
      Good for you! Keep adding 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.